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  • Get Screened and Get On With Living

    28 October 2018


    Cancer Council SA is teaming up with Adelaide PHN and Country SA PHN to launch a new campaign to encourage South Australians to get screened for cancer and ‘get on with living’.

    The campaign will be the first time that the organisations have joined together to invest in a state-wide cancer screening promotional campaign. 

    Currently, Australia runs three national cancer screening programs for bowel, breast and cervical cancer, which Lincoln Size, Chief Executive at Cancer Council SA, says is vital for early detection of cancer.

    “Early detection not only improves health outcomes, it reduces overall costs to the health system and most importantly, saves lives.” 

    “The evidence for screening is undeniable. For example, for women diagnosed with breast cancer, the risk of death was 42% lower among those diagnosed through BreastScreen Australia than those who had never screened , and 90% of all bowel cancers can be successfully treated if caught early,” Mr Size.

    “Furthermore, recent Cancer Council research shows that through a combination of the new Cervical Screening Test and the HPV vaccination, cervical cancer is likely to be eliminated as a public health issue within 20 years.”

    “It’s statistics like this that highlight just how important screening is, which is why we’re launching this new campaign encouraging South Australians to take advantage of the free screening tests available to them.”

    The campaign, which features the tagline “get screened and get on with living” focuses on the euphoric feeling that you get after you’ve completed your screening test and everything comes back ok. It’s about celebrating life as opposed to focusing on the fear and negative feelings which deter people from completing a screening test.

    CEO of Country SA PHN, Kim Hosking, and CEO of Adelaide PHN, Deb Lee, said that unfortunately, despite all the evidence showing that bowel, breast and cervical cancer screening effectively picks up cancer at earlier stages, there are still many South Australians who are putting off their routine screening tests. 

    “Research shows that in 2015-2016, less than half of eligible people completed their free, at-home bowel screening test, around a third of eligible women didn’t have a mammogram and 40 percent of eligible women didn’t have a Cervical Screening Test.”  

    “We want to raise awareness about screening and encourage South Australians to have a conversation with their GP about which cancer screening tests are available to them. Our hope is that through raising awareness, we can encourage further participation in the national cancer screening programs, and ultimately save more lives.”

    The campaign will be launched on Sunday, 28 October across South Australian radio, newspapers and social media.

    To find out more about the campaign and what cancer screening tests you’re eligible for, visit www.cancersa.org.au/get-screened-and-get-on-with-living.

     

    Breast Cancer Screening

    • Women aged 50-74 should have a free screening mammogram every two years through BreastScreen SA.
    • Book an appointment by calling 13 20 50
    • All women, regardless of their age should be ‘breast aware’ by familiarising themselves with the look and feel of their breasts, even if they are having regular mammograms.
    • Women are encouraged to speak to their GP about their family history for breast cancer.

     

    Bowel Cancer Screening

    • If you are 50 years and older, complete a bowel cancer screening test every two years.
    • The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program sends free bowel cancer screening kits to eligible people aged 50 to 74. For more information call 1800 118 868.
    • Men and women are encouraged to speak to their GP about their family history for bowel cancer.
       

    Cervical Cancer Screening

    • Since the introduction of the National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP) in 1991, the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer has halved in Australia.
    • Cancer Council research shows that through a combination of the new Cervical Screening Test and the HPV vaccination, cervical cancer is likely to be eliminated as a public health issue within 20 years
    • Women are due for their first Cervical Screening Test at age 25. Women aged 25 and over are due for their first Cervical Screening Test two years from their last Pap test.

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